Trendy condiment in Japan: Shiokoji (salted rice malt)

April 15th, 2012By Category: Health and Fitness

Image: Kobunsha

Shiokoji (salted rice malt) is a traditional condiment made from fermented malted rice, salt and water. Shiokoji has been used as condiment for fish and vegetable tsukemono (Japanese pickles) in Japan for a long time. But recently, it is being used in a variety of ways.

Shiokoji started coming to the attention of more people when enzyme diets became popular. Products containing enzymes are increasing as they are said to be good for beauty, health and diet. Shiokoji also contains enzymes which help digestion, speed up metabolism and excretion, so it is good for diet, constipation, detox, skin, stress, gaining immunity from diseases, and so on. Many Japanese celebrities such as Yuko Ogura and Takako Uehara have written on their blogs that they use shiokoji for cooking.

Here are some recipes featuring shiokoji.

Cabbage salad with shiokoji

Image: COCKPAD

Ingredients (for 2 people)

  • 1/3 of a cabbage
  • 2 teaspoons of shiokoji
  • 2 tablespoons of sesame oil
  • Sesame
  • Nori

1. Cut cabbage thinly

2. Mix cabbage, shiokoji and sesame oil in a bowl by hand

3. Sprinkle sesame and spread nori.

 

Tomato with shiokoji

Image: COCKPAD

Ingredients (for 2 people)

  • 2 tomatoes
  • 1 tablespoon of shiokoji
  • Half tablespoon of olive oil
  • Dried basil

1. Mix olive oil and shiokoji in a bowl.

2. Cut tomatoes

3. Put tomatoes on a dish and pour mixed olive oil and shiokoji on tomatoes and sprinkle dried basil

 You can also use Shiokouji not only for appetizers but also for main meals and desserts.

See more recipes at Cookpad.

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Author of this article

GaijinPot

GaijinPot is an online community for foreigners living in Japan, providing information on everything you need to know about enjoying life here, from finding a job and accommodation to having fun.

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